12 February 2018

Fragments in the clinic: ABBV-075 / Mivebresib

Bromodomains bind to acetylated lysine residues in proteins to control gene transcription. These epigenetic regulators have received considerable attention as drug targets, particularly for oncology. Last year we highlighted work out of AbbVie in which fragments found in an NMR screen were advanced to two series of molecules that potently inhibit the four members of the BET family of bromodomains. A more recent publication in J. Med. Chem. by Keith McDaniel and his colleagues at the company describes how one of the fragments was transformed into the clinical compound ABBV-075, or mivebresib.

Compound 6 was not the most potent fragment identified, but crystallography confirmed that it binds in the acetyl lysine binding pocket. The earlier work described how the pyridazinone moiety was replaced with a pyridone and another phenyl ring was added to make molecules such as compound 9, with sub-micromolar activity.

Further modification of the pyridone led to compound 19, with a nearly 20-fold boost in affinity. Crystallography revealed that the pyrrolopyridone makes a bidentate interaction with a critical asparagine residue in BRD4, and also displaces a “high-energy” water molecule.

Next, the researchers sought to pick up additional interactions, and it turned out that introducing a nitrogen off the central ring was synthetically straightforward and would point substituents towards a pocket in the protein. This led to low nanomolar inhibitors such as compound 25, and crystallography revealed that one of the sulfonamide oxygen atoms makes a hydrogen bond with a backbone amide. Happily, the improvement in potency was also accompanied by an improvement in stability in liver microsome assays.

Unfortunately, although the pharmacokinetics in mice were reasonable, these compounds showed high clearance in rats. Analysis of the metabolites revealed that this was largely due to oxidation of the unsubstituted phenyl ring, so the researchers took the classic route of introducing halogen atoms to both deactivate the ring and block metabolism sites. This ultimately led to ABBV-075.

In addition to excellent potency in biochemical, biophysical, and cell-based assays, ABBV-075 showed excellent antitumor effects in a mouse xenograft assay when dosed orally at the low concentration of just 1 mg/kg. In addition to BRD4, the compound binds tightly to the other BET family members but is selective against most of the other bromodomains. It also demonstrates good pharmacokinetic properties in mice, rats, dogs, monkeys, and humans. ClinicalTrials.gov lists a Phase 1 study currently recruiting.

This is a lovely, textbook example of how structurally-enabled fragment growing combined with careful pharmacokinetic-based optimization can lead to a clinical candidate. Obviously there is a long and uncertain road ahead for the molecule prior to approval, but getting this far is a victory in itself.

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